Archive for the ‘user research’ Category

Field notes from User Research London

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

nativeye took a trip to User Research London this month. A great conference, their very first one and heartily recommended for next year.

Here are my Tweet-notes…

Remote research was a recurring theme:

Which is so obvious as to be easily overlooked.

Again it’s obvious when someone says it, but really important when thinking when to use remote and ‘always-on’ tools.

The participant experience was also high on the agenda:

We think about this one a lot – how to keep participants engaged and let them know their contributions aren’t going into a black hole.

There were some lovely articulations of the value of research:

This is a great notion and a big part of what researchers do.

From the cxpartners keynote on how to select the right research method. Insight, evidence and ideas – the 3 things you can hope to gain from research.

Greg Bernstein on why some research is better than no research – and an importance defence when selling in research.

Stories were also big theme at UserResearchLdn:

How we add a narrative to our lives in retrospect.

And finally, on the importance of crafting a story to build empathy and adoption of research.

I will look out for the keynote presentations (a film of the talks is being published) and let you know when I find them.

Ben

The ACEO model of user experience research

Monday, September 1st, 2014

When designing a diary study to do ux research, user research or customer experience research, it is handy to have the ACEO model in mind as a guide.

ACEO stands for:

•    Activity – what are people doing?
•    Context – what is the context of their experience?
•    Emotion – what is the emotional impact?
•    Outcome – what is the result of the experience on the user/customer?

These are the four main elements of any individual experience. Structuring your exploration along these lines of enquiry will help you fully understand what is happening and why.

Let’s look at these in a bit more detail:

Activity

Quite simply what are people doing or trying to do relating to your product or service at that moment in time? This is an easy task to start with and will form the basis for the rest of your enquiry.

Context

What is happening at the time that might add a different meaning or interpretation to what people are doing? For example, what is their goal at that particular point? What frame of mind are they in? What other external factors are colouring their experience?

Emotion

Daniel Kahneman tells us that emotional peaks are the things that stick with us most, that make an experience a memorable experience.

And research for the advertising industry shows that if people feel nothing, they do nothing. The IPA found that emotional communications are 12 times more efficient in driving market share. If it’s action we want then we have to make people feel.

So we need to ask: what emotions are people feeling? How strong are these and what is driving them?

Outcome

Which leads us to our final element: outcome. We are not interested in user experiences out of idle curiosity – we need to know from a business perspective what this experience adds up to – either on its own and together with other experiences.

Only by tracking the outcome can we work out whether the experience was effective against any given goal and if and how it could be optimised.

Here we need to ask: what did people do next? Was this as a result of the experience? What was the influence of this experience on perceptions of the product / service / brand?

Summary

So there you have the ACEO modelActivity – Context – Emotion – Outcome, a four point framework for structuring your experience research diary studies.

This is an excerpt from nativeye’s Mobile Diary Bootcamp. If you’d like the whole thing in 6 handy emails just follow the link to sign up. It’s completely free!

Subscribe to Mobile Diary Bootcamp

Or click here nativeye.com/mobile-diary-bootcamp